REVIEW: The Rogue is Nissan's most important automobile, and the all-new compact SUV is more than all set to take on the Toyota RAV-4 and Honda CR-V thumbnail

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Nissan does not get as much press as Toyota and Honda, its primary competitors, however in lots of ways, the automaker has more to provide customers than its compatriots.
Through its long time participation in the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi alliance, Nissan became part of the world’s largest automaking business, by sales, in 2018, vanquishing Volkswagen. As a private nameplate, it offers whatever from the 370 Z sports car to the Leaf EV to the Titan full-size pickup, with numerous designs in other segments, selling at a wide variety of rate points, in between.
Nissan also has a luxury arm, Infiniti, that takes on Toyota’s Lexus and Honda’s Acura, however likewise with Audi, BMW, Mercedes, Cadillac, and Lincoln.
But if you were to look at all Nissan does, its essential automobile by far is the Rogue compact crossover SUV. In 2019, Nissan offered 350,00 o Rogues in the United States– an excellent figure, however down from more than 400,00 0 the previous 2 years.

The Rogue debuted in 2007, but it was the second-generation crossover that genuinely hit the bullseye for Nissan, perfectly timed for a switch that began in 2013, with buyers stating no to sedans and yes to compact SUVs. Rogue delighted in that market for 7 years, but ebbing sales recently showed that it was time for a redesign.
Nissan might have held the line and given the Rogue a moderate makeover, but the business went much farther, basing the 2021 Rogue on a new platform that generates something of an optical illusion: It has to do with the same size as the previous generation, however it looks bigger.
A compact-plus appearance

Compared with its main rivals, the Toyota RAV4 and the Honda CR-V, the brand-new Rogue has a sort of compact-plus appearance. Nissan gave a sneak peek a couple of months ago prior to loaning me a lorry to appropriately evaluate, and my very first reaction was, “Wow! Huge Rogue!”
That impression was increased by the reality that I own a RAV4 and might think about the two crossovers bumper-to-bumper. And the brand-new Rogue did certainly appear to be trending towards Pathfinder/Highlander measurements, even if it’s generally the exact same size as the outbound variation.

I’ve always loved the Rogue and have evaluated the gen-two automobile a variety of times. My take on Nissan is that it usually offers a more premium item than Toyota or Honda, but Nissan’s lorries can be behind the times as far as innovation goes, and they have a less sterling credibility for reliability than their Japanese competitors..
There’s a little bit of hairsplitting at play here, nevertheless. And both the RAV4 and CR-V have actually been around longer. Nissan makes a fine little truck, and the Rogue’s sales success considering that the mid-2010 might be chalked up to high-quality as much as excellent timing.
The cost is nice.

My review Rogue SL began at $33,400 and topped out at $35,275, with a $395 two-tone paint job and some fancy, $385 floor mats contributing to the price tag beyond the destination charges. The “Stone Gray/Super Black” outside was completely worth it and a good offer at less than $400 Worth for cash was a style that would recur typically in my days with the new Rogue.
The outcome is that Nissan has actually pushed itself just enough with this essential vehicle, fixing what wasn’t so appealing about the previous generation while not messing with what worked. The result is a Rogue that’s close to perfect, although with a couple of remaining problems.

To begin with, let’s do without the only thing one may want to complain about forcefully– the 2.5-liter, four-cylinder engine, which lacks turbocharging, puts out 181 horse power with 181 pound-feet of torque, and is mated to a continuously-variable transmission (CVT), yielding a 0-60 miles per hour time north of eight seconds. There is but one alternative.
The competitors has turbos, doesn’t confine you to a CVT, and is either slightly or substantially more effective than the Rogue, while utilizing in many cases smaller sized motors. On paper, the new Rogue is a loser in this department, however I’ve driven all the other compact mass-market SUVs on the marketplace, and day-to-day, the Rogue is naturally simply great.

Maybe I longed for a little more zest when combining to the legal speed limit in my New Jersey enclave. The CVT, nevertheless, is smooth and reasonably responsive, so while the Rogue can’t get gobs of readily available torque for passing maneuvers, it can handle the freeway.
Nissan is doing some difficult estimations here, presuming that potential purchasers desire a great crossover at a great rate and aren’t going to get hung up on driving characteristics and straight-line speed if the thing can basically go fast enough. In my experience, horse power hangups are not worth the time and effort it require to preserve them, especially when much of one’s driving is going to remain in traffic, anyway..
A reliable powertrain, and a premium interior.

Also, Nissan engines have a well-deserved track record for dependability, and with a naturally-aspirated 4 doing the work, there isn’t much that’s going to go wrong..
Dispensing with the gearhead gripes, we can move on to the great things: the Rogue SL’s lovely interior and much-improved suite of technologies. Freight capability is solid, at 36 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 73 cubic feet with them dropped. Towing capability is minimal, at 1,350 lbs., however that suffices to transport a modest trailer, and again, Nissan is angling for more passionate SUV consumers, choosing to provide an engaging update to the old-school station wagon.

My SL trim tester sits simply listed below the top-line Platinum and above the S and SV trims. My crossover had 19- inch alloy wheels, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and leather seats, a power liftgate, rear sunshades, and three climate zones (double front, single back). That’s a great deal of appealing extras for $33,400, and my SL was also all-wheel-drive.
That price isn’t too away what I spent for my licensed secondhand 2017 Toyota RAV4 hybrid, which does not have leather seats and a powered liftgate. Objectively, the 2021 Rogue SL is a better package, even if I wouldn’t be getting slightly greater fuel-economy. (Nissan didn’t offer me with that data, however it’s around 30 mpg, according to some other customers.).

In the front and rear seats, I felt comfortable and even borderline pampered, something I also do not experience in my RAV4. This is nothing brand-new for me and Nissan SUVs– I usually stress, simply a bit, that the brand is pressing Infiniti’s mojo by using such premium interiors.
Additional interior materials and visits were all high-ish grade. This isn’t a Mercedes, but the new Rogue more than offsets what it lacks in power by welcoming you to hang around inside the cabin.
Enhanced innovation and a comforting redesign.

Nissan has updated the Rogue’s infotainment system with a responsive nine-inch central touchscreen. It does whatever well, from handling Bluetooth and USB connections to supporting both Apple CarPlay and Android Vehicle.
At this point, this car basically satisfies the industry standard for compact-crossover tech, and it’s certainly equivalent with comparable offerings from Honda and Toyota, neither of which are noted for superlative infotainment systems. (If this is critical for you, then Ford and Chevy have especially much better setups in their crossovers.).

I wouldn’t call the brand-new Rogue amazing even assuring. It’s reasonably enjoyable to drive, however it genuinely shines in easy puttering around the suburbs, running errands, or on highway jaunts when the CVT and engine can reach a mellow cruising speed. It has lots of room for things in the cargo hold, and the back seats are spacious enough that grownups must have the ability to tolerate them for short trips.
Everything inside looks just a bit much better than it did on the previous generation, and the boxier outside style provides the Rogue some additional road existence, putting it in GMC Surface area. The rear doors have actually even been reconsidered to swing out a complete 90 degrees, something that parents with small children who are still in car seats or boosters ought to value.

The verdict on the 2021 Rogue is Nissan didn’t fix what wasn’t broken and did repair what some owners may have grumbled about, while not messing with a successful formula so much that sales might be threatened.
In fact, there are more factors than ever to take a close take a look at the Rogue, and that ought to keep the crossover in its number-one United States sales position for the United States, and number 3 total amongst compact SUVs.
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Nissan Rogue.

Nissan Rogue.

Nissan Rogue.

Nissan Rogue.

Nissan Rogue.

Nissan Rogue.

Nissan Rogue.

Nissan Rogue.

Nissan Rogue.

Nissan Rogue.

Nissan Rogue.

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